You are here:

DVAM banner

Join us this October to raise awareness about domestic violence and its negative impacts on our campus and community. We will be highlighting support resources for survivors and their loved ones, inspiring thoughtful dialogue on prevention, and promoting healthy relationships.

Follow our social media accounts @uofuwellness as well as our partner offices so you don't miss out on events and involvement opportunities!

dvam infographic

 Events

 

Awareness in Action

 

wellness

Dating and Domestic Violence disrupts all facets of a survivor's wellness. A survivor's social, emotional, intellectual, financial, spiritual, and physical wellness is thrown off balance. This is why support and awareness is crucial.

 

jake1jake2

In the last several decades, a wide spread emphasis on strategies to engage men and boys in preventing violence against women and girls has grown. We must examine the fundamental causes of men and boys’ violence including social and structural ones as well as gender role socialization and men's sexism.

Check out this powerful video that explains how gender roles can prevent or contribute to violence against women and girls. 

college power and control

 

For college students, Domestic and Dating Violence may look and function a little differently. This Power and Control Wheel is a great resource specific to college students to help them evaluate the relationships in their lives. 

Emotional Abuse: Putting you down, Not letting you study/do assignments, Keeping you up all night before an exam, gaslighting you
Technology: Monitoring your social network sites, Demanding passwords to online accounts, Texting/calling you constantly, Using tracking systems, GPS, and/or spyware to monitor you
Economic Abuse: Controlling income (Paychecks, financial aid, etc.), Having you pay for their books, tuition, rent, etc., Controlling your flex, CrimsonCash, meal plan, etc., Controlling how you spend your money
Coercion and Threats: Making and/or carrying out threats to hurt you, Threatening to transfer/leave school, Threatening suicide, Making you do illegal behaviors, Forcing you to drink alcohol or use drugs
Intimidation: Making you afraid by using looks, actions and gestures, Destroying books, computer, etc., Displaying weapons
Isolation: Making you stay in your residence hall/apartment, Deleting contacts from your phone, Deactivating/limiting social network usage, Not letting you go home for breaks, Keeping you from friends, roommates, classmates, etc., Not letting you to join organizations or clubs
Minimizing, denying and blaming: Denies abuse is taking place, blames you (“You made me do this and now I could get kicked out of school because you get me angry and started this fight”), Partner minimizes extent of abuse (“I don’t hit you… that’s real abuse” or “I only slapped you”) Gender Privilege: Treating you like you are inferior or their subordinate, Making all the big decisions, Defining and requiring rigid gender roles

 

stalking 1stalking 2stalking 3

Stalking is a form of interpersonal violence. Trust your gut and get help if something is off. 
Anyone who has experienced stalking is eligible for free, confidential support services from the Center for Student Wellness Victim-Advocates. Call 801.581.7776 or email advocate@sa.utah.edu for support. If you are in danger, call 911. Report incidents of stalking on campus to the UUPD at 801.585.2677

 

 dvam kid

Despite the high occurrence of childhood exposure to interpersonal violence (IPV), children are inherently resilient and can move forward from stressful events. One way children can heal is by having adults who care provide guidance, love, and support in the aftermath. .
To learn about the cause & effects and supportive resources for childhood exposure to IPV, check out the link in our bio.
We support U of U students, faculty and staff who are parents and are available to assist and advocate for survivors of IPV. Call 801.581.7776 or email advocate@sa.utah.edu.
If you are aware of child abuse or neglect, please call 911 (emergency) or the Department of Child and Family Services (non-emergency) at 855.323.DCFS (3237) 

 

male survivors

The University of Utah Center for Student Wellness Victim-Survivor Advocates provide free, confidential support services to all campus community members who’ve experienced interpersonal violence. This means our services are available to all genders. Information and resources for and about male survivors are available.  https://www.huffpost.com/entry/domestic-violence-resourc_b_10281088 

Call 801.585.7776 or email advocate@sa.utah.edu

The U of U Department of Public Safety supports Dating & Domestic Violence Awareness Month. They play a vital role in keeping our campus community safe. Look for the officers sporting purple arm badges, purple ribbons on the police cars, and come to Fall Into Safety on 10/17 FROM 11am-1pm at the Union Plaza. 

Before colonization, women were valued and honored in native cultures. Today, violence against indigenous people has reached epidemic levels. The reported rates of murder, rape, domestic and dating violence, and stalking are much higher than non-native women. The overwhelming majority of Native women identify their attackers as non-native. This Indigenous Peoples' Day, reject whitewashed history and norms that normalize violence against indigenous people. . Utah Domestic Violence Link Line: 800.897.5465 . StrongHearts Native Helpline is a culturally appropriate, confidential service for Native Americans affected by domestic and dating violence. 844.762.8483 (M-F 8am-4:30pm MST) . . . @strongheartsdv #uofudvam #dvam #indigenouspeoplesday #mmiw #universityofutah #safeu (art by Sam English)

Art by Sam English 
Before colonization, women were valued and honored in native cultures. Today, violence against indigenous people has reached epidemic levels. The reported rates of murder, rape, domestic and dating violence, and stalking are much higher than non-native women. The overwhelming majority of Native women identify their attackers as non-native. This Indigenous Peoples' Day, reject whitewashed history and norms that normalize violence against indigenous people. 

 

 lgbtq

Abusive partners in LGBTQ relationships use all the same tactics to gain power and control as abusive partners in heterosexual relationships — physical, sexual or emotional abuse, financial control, isolation and more. But abusive partners in LGBTQ relationships also reinforce their tactics that maintain power and control with societal factors that compound the complexity a survivor faces in leaving or getting safe in an LGBTQ relationship.

 Visit: https://www.thehotline.org/is-this-abuse/lgbt-abuse/ and https://www.glbthotline.org/ 

Thank you to our committee members, student participants & partner offices!!

Center for Student Wellness, LGBT Resource Center, It's On Us, Center for Ethnic Student Affairs, University Student Apartments, Women's Enrollment Initiative, University Counseling Center, U of U Department of Public Safety, Alpha Chi Omega, Marriott Library, Kyle Ethelbah, Clients of the CSW Victim-Survivor Advocacy 

 

 

 

 

Last Updated: 10/22/18